The Longest Shortest Time

EPISODE #162: Cecile Richards on Troublemaker Moms

Cecile Richards, former head of Planned Parenthood, is a troublemaker — a quality she got from her mom, Ann Richards, who went from frustrated housewife to firecracker governor of Texas.

Episode #161: Imaginary Friends & Grown-ups

The imaginary friends you invent when you’re little can be great practice for dealing with hard stuff later on. Plus, a barfing troll and a little egg who raps!

Episode #160: Imaginary Friends & Kids

A glimpse into the weird, fun, and often dark world of imaginary companions.

EPISODE #159: A Killer Story

Poet Rachel Zucker is wrestling with the question, “Did I kill my mom… with words?” Tune in for a special Mother’s Day edition of our show.

EPISODE #158: Black Lives Matter for Middle Schoolers

In the novel Ghost Boys, a twelve-year-old unarmed black boy is shot by a white police officer. Jewell Parker Rhodes talks about why she wrote this story for middle schoolers, and why she’s counting on them to advance racial justice.

EPISODE #157: Car Births, Call-In Style

People who give birth in cars reeeally love telling the story. So we opened up our phone lines and invited them to call in.

EPISODE #156: The Scary, Beautiful Teenage Brain

Why would a sweet kid from Minnesota try to join ISIS? Reporter Dina Temple-Raston fills us in on the complexities of the teenage brain, with help from pizza and poetry. Plus: “What’s Up with Hillary?” – Nor’easter Edition.

EPISODE #155: Forget Childbirth

For generations, women elected to forget the pain of childbirth with help from powerful drugs called twilight sleep. We shed light on an (intentionally) forgotten history.

EPISODE #154: Let’s Get Unladylike

Andrea talks to Cristen Conger and Caroline Ervin, hosts of the fabulous Unladylike podcast, about abortion, nannies, and counting your eggs before they’re… inseminated. Plus, how to speak up, vocal fry and all.

EPISODE #153: Sperm Shopping by Color

When Rosa and her wife started seeking a sperm donor, they were surprised by the complexity of the questions they faced — from “What kind of racial identity matters to us?” to “Should we buy in bulk?”